Mathilda Marque Bouaret

 Mathilda Marque Bouaret belongs to a generation that has chosen painting to describe its dreams. Their disquieting character gives to this enterprise the stamp of cruel truths.

On canvas, cardboard, metal or brick, Mathilda Marque Bouaret’s paintings have in common a curious form of strangeness accentuated by their apparent awkwardness. They are uncomfortable images. They emanate from a dreamlike world where characters, more or less deformed, are frozen in postures both familiar and bizarre. Mathilda Marque Bouaret writes down scenes she sees or mental images in notebooks whose drawings will initially be paintings. She seeks, she says, to surprise herself. One understands the uneasiness that can arise from the situations that the artist stages. The light, the colors, the forms depicted in these paintings carry the mark of facticity that the bodies only reinforce. Mathilda Marque Bouaret’s imagination is intranquil, her paintings hesitate between humor and fright: two snails embrace on the beach, seagulls with a silly look pass over characters, two hands hold “an endive like a small bird”, the naked back of a figure with an uncertain sex offers a disturbing pearly mass, they are always embarrassing images by their enigmatic character and their half-naïve half-ironic treatment.